Here are two recipes generously shared with me at the nursery, both originate in Alaska.

Recipe #1

Ingredients:
11/2  C chopped onions                               4 C water
8C high bush cranberries, fresh or frozen
1 C cider vinegar                                          11/4 C packed brown sugar
1 C light corn syrup                                       11/2  tsp salt
11/2 tsp cinnamon                                        11/2 tsp ground allspice
1 tsp ginger                                                    1/4 tsp ground cloves

Combine onion and water in a large, aluminum free pan. Bring to a boil and simmer until the onion pieces are clear.
Add the berries and bring the mixture to a boil; partially cover the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the berries are soft, about 10 minutes.
Puree the mixture and return it to the rinsed out pan. Add the remaining ingredients. Bring the ketchup to a boil over medium high heat and boil, stirring constantly, until it is thick, about 3-5 minutes. If the ketchup becomes too thick, thin it with a little extra vinegar and water. Taste the ketchup and add a little more sugar and/or salt if desired.

Recipe #2

Ingredients:
4 pounds highbush cranberries or 21/2 quarts                  1 pound chopped onions
2 cups water                                                                          2 cups vinegar
4 cups sugar                                                                          1 tbsp ground cloves
1 tbsp ground cinnamon                                                       1 tbsp ground allspice
1 tbsp celery salt                                                                   1 tsp salt

Cook the cranberries and onions in the water until soft. Put the mixture through a food mill to remove the large seeds. Return the mixture to the kettle and add the vinegar, spices, and sufar. Simmer until the mixture thickens and reaches the consistency of bottled ketchup. Pour into sterilized jars according to manufacturers directions or freeze.    This recipe is considered excellent for serving with wild game (moose, elk, or venison).