December in Your Garden

  1. After winter storms, check your trees for damage

    After winter storms, check your trees for damage
    Two apple trees, coated in ice following an ice storm, with the sun shining bright in the afternoon sky. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) After winter storms, inspect trees and bushes for damage. Make clean cuts where there are ragged tears and breaks to minimize fungal infection opportunity. Prop fallen trees back up, if the root system has not been damaged...
  2. Grafting in the Winter

    Grafting in the Winter
    English: Photo of a recently grafted cherry root stock and scion (Photo credit: Wikipedia) If you are planning to do some grafting this winter or next spring, December –February is the time to collect scion wood, from fully dormant trees. You need the previous seasons’ healthy vegetative growth for the scion (the shoot you cut from a desired variety...
  3. FAQs: When should I expect to harvest the first fruit from my new fruit tree/berries?

    FAQs: When should I expect to harvest the first fruit from my new fruit tree/berries?
    English: Fruit on display at La Boqueria market in Barcelona. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) When should I expect to harvest the first fruit from my new fruit tree? Our standard answer is 2-3 years to first fruit. In some cases your trees may arrive with flower buds and be apparently ready to produce fruit. It is best, however, to remove...
  4. Peach leaf curl control

    Peach leaf curl control
    English: Peach leaf curl by Taphrina deformans (from Professional Institute of Agriculture and Environment "Cettolini" Villacidro, Italy) Italiano: Bolla del pesco causata da Taphrina deformans (Photo credit: Wikipedia) One of the more significant fungal diseases in the Pacific Northwest on peaches is Peach Leaf Curl. Once the chill requirement for the peach tree has been met, the sealed bud...
  5. Pruning in December

    Pruning in December
    Pruning shears. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Once your trees, shrubs, and vines have achieved full dormancy (leaves on the ground for deciduous plants, no tender new growth buds visible on evergreen plants) you can begin dormant season pruning. If you tend to experience a lot of freeze, wind, or fungal damage during the more severe part of winter it might...

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