February in Your Garden

  1. Dormant season pruning continues in February

    Dormant season pruning continues in February
    English: Pruning the vines (Photo credit: Wikipedia) See the Raintree Plant Owners Manual for basic pruning information, or check out our selection of pruning books. Finish pruning grapes, kiwis, figs, maples, and other heavy sap producers this month, before the weather starts to warm, to avoid excess bleeding from the wounds. Prune stone fruits (plum, cherry, peach, apricot, and almond) after...
  2. It's planting time for moderate winter climates!

    It's planting time for moderate winter climates!
    A test site with several fruit tree forms located at Gaasbeek Castle. (Wikicommons) Planting time has arrived for those in moderate winter climates including people living west of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest. So long as the ground is not under water or water-logged, frozen or covered with snow, and the temperature is above freezing when you...
  3. Dormant Season Spraying: Now Is the Time

    Dormant Season Spraying: Now Is the Time
    Shothole blight on a peach tree. Photo credit: Utah State University extension Late winter is the time to apply dormant oil spray to control insects or eggs over-wintering on the trunks or limbs of your trees. Focus on trees you saw significant infestations of aphid or scale in last year. Some dormant oil products may have insecticide in them...
  4. Dig Up Potted Bulbs Now to Force Early Spring Color

    Dig Up Potted Bulbs Now to Force Early Spring Color
    English: Tulip, 2005 Floriade, Canberra (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Dig up potted bulbs you sunk in the ground last fall to force early spring color. Keep them in a cool greenhouse or basement and provide 12 hours a day of supplemental light. When flower buds start showing some color bring them inside to enjoy. The flowers will last longer if they...
  5. Soil Testing Is Important to the Health of Your Garden

    Soil Testing Is Important to the Health of Your Garden
    Homeowners are encouraged to test their soils for nutrient needs, and to apply only what nutrients are needed for a healthy lawn. Farmers practice the same testing procedure. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) How well did your plants grow for you last year? A soil test might be needed if you noticed last years’ growth was weak, off-color (red summer leaves...
  6. Fruit Storage: Apple and Pear Varieties That Keep Well

    Fruit Storage: Apple and Pear Varieties That Keep Well
    English: A "Belle de Boskoop" apple. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Check stored fruit for rot, discard or use any fruits with bad spots. Many fruits will still be in excellent shape. Apples Belle de Boskoop, Karmijn de Sonneville, Enterprise, King Edward VII and Melrose apples all have a long storage life. Pears Comice, Bosc, Highland and Conference European pears, and...
  7. Tips for Those of You Doing Your Own Grafting: Bench Grafting

    Tips for Those of You Doing Your Own Grafting: Bench Grafting
    Grafted apple and starts (Photo credit: johnpaulgoguen) Bench grafting is done during the dormant season. Dormant scion wood is grafted to a bare root rootstock that is either dormant or starting to grow, and held at 60-70 °F for 10-14 days to give the wounds time to start healing. The new plants are then held at cooler temperatures (35-45 °F...
  8. Tips for Those of You Doing Your Own Grafting: Get the Right Tools

    Tips for Those of You Doing Your Own Grafting: Get the Right Tools
    For people purchasing rootstocks, Raintree Nursery offers 8 inch by 3/8 inch by .020 inch grafting bands. With these you can quickly wrap grafts without wax. Grafting knife 005 (Photo credit: Wikipedia) There are a few tools you will need to make your grafts. If you choose to use a knife it needs to be very sharp, and have a...
  9. Tips for Those of You Doing Your Own Grafting: Plant Rootstocks for Budding

    Tips for Those of You Doing Your Own Grafting: Plant Rootstocks for Budding
    Photo of a recently grafted cherry root stock and scion (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Stone fruits, such as apricots, peaches, cherries, and nectarines, and certain cultivars of other fruits propagate most reliably from summer budding, though all but peaches and nectarines can be grafted in early spring. Budding is also an excellent technique for making the largest number of trees...
  10. Planting and growing raspberries

    Planting and growing raspberries
    English: Raspberries Français : Framboises Deutsch: Himbeeren Nederlands: Frambozen ‪Norsk (bokmål)‬: Bringebær Italiano: Lamponi Română: Zmeure Suomi: Vadelmia Svenska: Hallon Magyar: Málna Español: Frambuesas Azərbaycan: Moruq Português: Framboesa Tiếng Việt: Quả mâm xôi chín. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Raspberries are typically grown in a two foot wide row. Prepare the soil for planting by first clearing weeds in a 3-4’...

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