January in Your Garden

  1. Caring for winter damaged trees

    Caring for winter damaged trees
    Winter storms and arctic cold events can be damaging to trees and shrubs. Remember to inspect your plants for broken limbs or lodging over in soppy wet soils after storms. Make clean cuts when you find broken, torn, or split limbs. Clean cuts will be less susceptible to fungal infection than ragged breaks. If you have lost the top of a...
  2. Tips on winter storage and release of Mason Bees

    Tips on winter storage and release of Mason Bees
    We plan to ship mason bees mid-January through the end of February, weather permitting. When you receive your bees they need to be kept cool until you are ready to release them. Keep them in the refrigerator at 36-39° F. It is important to maintain proper humidity for the bees in a frost free refrigerator. Poke several small holes in a plastic bag, put...
  3. Planting tips for our customers in the deep South

    If you are in one of those southern sunny locations where the optimal planting time is before we are able to begin shipping to you, you may need to take special care with your plants when you do receive them. Please see our Plant Owner’s Manual, pg 10, for late planting instructions or the following: 1.If you choose to plant...
  4. Planting tips for gardeners in warm and maritime climate areas

    Planting of potted and bare root stock can begin in January in moderate winter climate locations. In some southern areas January is the best month for planting. West of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest, so long as the ground is not under water or water-logged, frozen, or covered with snow, you can go ahead and plant. Planting at...
  5. How to determine which plants will work in your location

    How to determine which plants will work in your location
    Along with understanding temperature patterns in your area, it is also important to determine how much and for how long daily your plant will receive sun in a particular location. Fruiting trees, such as apple, pear, and plum, initiate new flower buds for the next spring season between late June and early August, depending on your location. Typically, a minimum...
  6. Do your grapes need fertilizer?

    Do your grapes need fertilizer?
    Cabernet Franc Grape, Raintree Nursery catalog #H520 The book “From Vines to Wines” describes how to evaluate your grapevine performance and calculate fertilizer needs for an optimal balance of fruiting and growth. Or you could take a more simplified approach for backyard grapes. First year vines often don’t need fertilizer. If the leaves were deep green and the vine...
  7. Grafting tips: Collecting and storing scion wood

    Grafting tips: Collecting and storing scion wood
    Budding and Grafting Fruit Trees from University of California If you are planning to do some grafting this year, December through February is the time to collect and store your Scion wood. See page 49 in the new 2014 Raintree Nursery catalog for more information. You need the previous seasons’ healthy vegetative growth for the scion (the shoot you...
  8. Pruning in the winter

    Pruning in the winter
    Cover via Amazon In the Pacific Northwest plants become fully dormant in December. Dormant season pruning generally begins in January, after the distractions of the winter holidays. If there is still a significant risk of snow, ice or wind damage in your trees it may be best to wait another month or so to start pruning. Certain plants are...
  9. Planting tips for gardeners in warm and maritime climate areas

    Planting tips for gardeners in warm and maritime climate areas
    Planting of potted and bare root stock can begin in January in moderate winter climate locations. In some southern areas January is the best month for planting. West of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest, so long as the ground is not under water or water-logged, frozen, or covered with snow, you can go ahead and plant. Planting at...
  10. Tips on winter storage and release of Mason Bees

    Tips on winter storage and release of Mason Bees
    Homes of mason bees (Photo credit: Wikipedia) We plan to ship mason bees mid-January through the end of February, weather permitting. When you receive your bees they need to be kept cool until you are ready to release them. Keep them in the refrigerator at 36-39° F. It is important to maintain proper humidity for the bees in a...

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