March in Your Garden

  1. Check Your Irrigation Systems

    Check Your Irrigation Systems
    Irrigation equipment. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Now is a good time to look over stored irrigation equipment and order replacement parts. Make sure you have a plan for irrigating new plantings this year and order additional parts if needed. All new plantings need at least some irrigation in their first summer, unless you receive about 1” of rainfall every week...
  2. Fertilizing Your Container Plants

    Fertilizing Your Container Plants
    Select a fertilizer that is appropriate for the plant you are growing to get optimal performance in the container. Use citrus fertilizer for citrus plants, and blueberry/rhododendron fertilizer for vacciniums (blueberry, huckleberry, lingonberry and cranberry). For Bananas, encourage lots of vigorous growth initially with a foliage supportive formula that has a high nitrogen content, then switch to a formula that...
  3. Mason Bees Emerge in the Month of March!

    Mason Bees Emerge in the Month of March!
    Homes of mason bees (Photo credit: Wikipedia) As temperatures warm in the spring the mason bees start emerging from their over-wintering cocoons. The males emerge first, followed by the females after a few days. Make sure -- if you haven’t already done so -- that there are plenty of clean new tubes for the females to deposit their eggs...
  4. How to Prevent Frost Damage on Non-Dormant Hardy Plants

    How to Prevent Frost Damage on Non-Dormant Hardy Plants
    Frost on plants on a very cold winter morning. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Most of the plants we ship are dormant from cold storage. However some are potted and are growing. The following is how to handle those leafed out plants. Sometimes you might receive non-dormant plants that would normally be dormant and ready to plant outside. Our hardy plant...
  5. Planting and Growing Raspberries

    Planting and Growing Raspberries
    Raspberries. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Raspberries are typically grown in a two foot wide row. Prepare the soil for planting by first clearing weeds in a 3-4’ wide strip the length you are planning to plant. Put a 3-4” thick layer of composted manure (cow, steer, or other ruminants, not chicken) or leaf mold on the surface of the row...
  6. Planting Time Continues in Cold Climates

    Planting Time Continues in Cold Climates
    New orchard planting (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Planting time continues for those of us living West of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest, and other similar climate locations throughout the country. So long as the ground is not under water or water-logged, frozen, or covered with snow, and the weather is above freezing when you plant, you can plant...
  7. What do I do if my plants have arrived, but I can’t plant right away?

    The goal is to keep the bare root plants cool and dormant, and protect the roots from freezing or drying out. You can generally hold the plants up to two weeks in the bags they arrived in, in a cool (35-45°F) location. Check the bags for moisture a couple times, the shredded paper around the roots should be moist and...
  8. Continue dormant season pruning

    . The best time to prune stone fruits is as the buds swell. This is because the wounds seal more quickly, reducing opportunity for fungal infections to occur. If you are growing tip-bearing apples such as Thompkins King and want to encourage them to branch, wait until new growth has extended 4-6 inches, then make heading cuts into last year’s...
  9. Mason bees start to emerge

    Mason bees start to emerge
    This image shows an Red Mason Bee couple (osmia rufa). (Photo credit: Wikipedia) As temperatures warm in the spring the mason bees start emerging from their over-wintering cocoons. The males emerge first, followed by the females after a few days. Make sure, if you haven’t already done so, that there are plenty of clean new tubes for the females...
  10. Factors to consider if you have had pollination problems

    A European honey bee (Apis mellifera) extracts nectar from an Aster flower using its proboscis. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) If you have had problems with adequate pollination in the past, the following are some factors to consider.  Look at your fruiting plants as they come into bloom, especially those that did not set fruit well last year. Notice if there...

Items 1 to 10 of 12 total

Page