May in Your Garden

  1. Container Plant Care in May

    Container Plant Care in May
    (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Water and fertilize regularly to keep up with the needs of actively growing plants. Allow citrus to dry out somewhat between each watering, but keep figs and bamboo evenly moist. If a plant regularly wilts in the afternoon but the container always seems to have enough moisture in it move the container so it is protected...
  2. Late Spring Mason Bee Care

    Late Spring Mason Bee Care
    (Photo credit: Wikipedia) It is important to control mites in your mason bees to keep them healthy. One method is to clean them after the bees have matured in the fall (see the October Growing Tips). Another method is to manage the temperatures they are maintained at during the summer as they mature, particularly in the Pacific Northwest and...
  3. Caterpillar Control

    Caterpillar Control
    Plum curculio and the damage caused (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Spinosad (#T177), a quick acting broad spectrum natural insecticide spray derived from the metabolites of a common soil bacterium, and BioNeem (#T172), a natural insecticide derived from the Neem tree, are both effective against codling moth, plum curculio, and currant worm caterpillars before they enter the fruit. Use Spinosad for...
  4. What do I do if my plants have come but I can't plant right away?

    The goal is to keep the bare root plants cool and dormant, and protect the roots from freezing or drying out. You can generally hold the plants up to two weeks in the bags they arrived in, in a cool (35-45º F) location. Check the bags for moisture a couple times, the shredded paper around the roots should be moist...
  5. A tip for those of you in cold winter areas who are receiving our potted plants

    A tip for those of you in cold winter areas who are receiving our potted plants
    Planting Out Non-Dormant Hardy Potted Plants:  Sometimes you might receive cold hardy plants that are no longer dormant but you are still experiencing winter conditions.  Our hardy plant greenhouses are kept to a minimum of about 28-30 degrees F at night, but late winter or early spring day time sun can warm them up well into the 70's. The resultant...
  6. Planting in Cold or Warm Spring Weather

    Planting in Cold or Warm Spring Weather
    Methley plum PLANTING:  So long as the ground is not under water or water-logged, frozen, or covered with snow, and the weather is above freezing when you plant, you can plant dormant potted or bare root plants. For optimal results planting bare root plants, day time temperatures should be below the mid-60's for several weeks following planting (to give roots time...
  7. Growing worm-free, spray-free apples

    Growing worm-free, spray-free apples
    "This is why my apples wear nylons through the growing season," said Sharon Clark in an email to Raintree Nursery customer service. Do apple maggot control bags work? Just ask Raintree Nursery customer Sharon Clark. "They do work, see attachment of photo of two apples from same tree, one grew with one grew without," Clark said. The new heavier...
  8. Grafting Tips in May

    Grafting Tips in May
    Budding & Grafting Fruit Trees, a reprint from the University of California, 8 pages. Closeup photos and text on how to bud and graft fruit trees. $2.95. In the Pacific Northwest there is a small window of opportunity in the spring in which you can insert Spring bud grafts into existing trees or rootstocks; after established trees have started...
  9. Weed control, vital to plant health

    Weed control, vital to plant health
    Weed killers can be harmful to your fruiting plants. Avoid using broadcast weed and feed lawn products within the root zone area of your fruit trees, which can be harmed by the herbicides. The typical spread of an established trees root system is 3-5 times the width of the canopy. Spray drift from glyphosate (in Roundup and other products) can...
  10. Hot weather transplanting tips

    Hot weather transplanting tips
    If you live where the temperatures are going into the 80s, we do not recommend planting bare rooted plants at this time. We still have many potted plants which we can safely send, but hot weather places heavy stress on plants coming out of cold storage. We are available to talk with you at 800-391-8892. We send planting information with...

10 Item(s)