November in Your Garden

  1. Are My Apples Ripe?

    Are My Apples Ripe?
    In the Pacific Northwest, the earliest varieties are often ready to start picking by mid-August. If you are not sure when you should start checking the varieties in your yard for their ripeness, review our ripening order list on our website under plant care or consult the Raintree catalog. Some people like their fruit more green and tart, others more...
  2. Fall Planting

    Fall Planting
    If hard winter freezes are at least four-six weeks away you can continue planting potted nursery stock and Spring Flowering Bulbs. West of the Cascades our typical late fall temperatures are mild enough that you can still fall plant through the end of November. We include Fall Planting Instructions and our Raintree Plant Owners Manual with each fall order we...
  3. Preparing Your Mason Bees for Winter

    Preparing Your Mason Bees for Winter
    If you haven’t done so already, it is time to clean your mason bees and blocks, and prepare them for winter. By October, mason bees have finished pupating inside their cocoons and are mature, waiting for springs’ signal to emerge. Between now and early December you can handle the bees inside their cocoons without damaging them, or waking them up accidentally...
  4. Plan NOW for spring planting

    Plan NOW for spring planting
    Are you planning to put in more trees or shrubs next spring?  If you know what trees and shrubs you want, and where they will be planted, you can prepare the planting holes for them now. Make a plan of where you will plant your new trees, and mark the locations in your landscape. Clear the weeds in a 2-3’ wide...
  5. Planning ahead for spring

    Planning ahead for spring
    Planned backyard garden (Photo credit: renoir_girl) Are you planning to put in more trees or shrubs next spring? If you know what trees and shrubs you want, and where they will be planted, you can prepare the planting holes for them now. Make a plan of where you will plant your new trees, and mark the locations in your...
  6. Don't over-water plants but don't forget them

    Don't over-water plants but don't forget them
    English: A collection of watering cans of assorted sizes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Be careful not to over-water plants in the greenhouse or indoors as their growth slows down with shorter and cooler days. Water thoroughly, then allow most plants to dry out before watering again. Provide humidity for citrus and other sub-tropical plants growing indoors. Outside, most locations will...
  7. Avoid pruning if possible; cut back your blackberries and raspberries

    Avoid pruning if possible; cut back your blackberries and raspberries
    Avoid fruit tree pruning, except broken or dead limbs, if trees or shrubs are not fully dormant or approaching dormancy. Open wounds heal more slowly as trees are approaching dormancy, increasing the opportunity for fungal infections to occur. If you have not yet done so, cut out old dead fruited canes from blackberries, raspberries, and related hybrids after fruiting and...
  8. November: Prepare potted plants for winter weather

    November: Prepare potted plants for winter weather
    If you have not yet experienced your first fall frost, as your first frost date approaches, prepare hardy plants you are growing outdoors in containers for winter. Plant roots are generally not as cold hardy as the top of the plant, so they need to be protected from freezing during severe winter weather. Potted Plants (Photo credit: PinkMoose) Sink containers to the rim...
  9. Harvesting Quince

    Harvesting Quince
    Painting of quince fruit and foliage (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Quinces are ready to harvest when they are aromatic and the seeds have matured to a dark color. The background color in the portion of skin that never sees the sun changes from green to yellow or yellow-green about the same time the seeds mature. Eat non-astringent varieties while firm, sliced...
  10. Transplanting a tree or shrub previously planted in the wrong spot

    Transplanting a tree or shrub previously planted in the wrong spot
    Demonstration of transplanting a tree at the Horticultural Centre of the City of Paris. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Fall is an excellent time to relocate your over-sized or struggling plant that has been in the wrong spot, or one that was planted in a temporary location last spring. Ideally your plant should be fully dormant, or nearly so. Make sure the root system is...

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