October in Your Garden

  1. Chestnut Stir Fry

    Chestnut Stir Fry
    This recipe is from the Outstanding "Chestnut Cookbook" by Anne Bhagwandin This is a light, quick and easy vegetarian dish. 1/2 lb. fresh chestnuts 7 oz pkg. of bean thread noodles 1/4lb shiitake mushrooms 1 medium zucchini squash 3 tbsp peanut oil 4 thin slices ginger 1 clove garlic crushed 1 small can bamboo shoots soy sauce Roast and peel...
  2. Do your homework now; Plan for your spring garden!

    Are you planning to put in an orchard next spring, or re-design your landscape with more edible plants? Robert Kouriks’ “Your Edible Landscape Naturally” will guide you through each step of the design process. A good starting point in landscape design is to make a drawing of your landscape, including the hard-scape (buildings, paths, other structures, or the drain field...
  3. It's Cider Making Time!

    It's Cider Making Time!
    Apples are an all-American success story-each of us eats more than 19 pounds of them annually. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Here at Raintree Nursery we enjoy making apple cider each October. We use a Cider Press to extract the juice from the apples, ours is made by Correll. They are hand made and do have a waiting list. www.correllciderpresses.com Often...
  4. Irrigation in the fall: Not too little, not too much

    Irrigation in the fall: Not too little, not too much
    English: Drip irrigation uses a series of pipes and tubes to deliver water to the base of each plant. Because little water is lost to evaporation and runoff, this method uses less water than sprinklers and trenches. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) In most locations fall rains should have begun and plants would then no longer need regular irrigation. If that...
  5. Mason Bee Care in the Fall

    Homes of mason bees (Photo credit: Wikipedia) By October, mason bees have finished pupating inside their cocoons and are mature, waiting for springs’ signal to emerge. Between now and early December you can handle the bees inside their cocoons without damaging them, or waking them up accidentally, making this the ideal time to clean your mason bees and blocks...
  6. Fall pest maintenance: Destroy infested fruits

    Spray copper on apples and pears affected by anthracnose or European (Nectria) cankers at 50% leaf-fall. Apply spray for bacterial canker to stone fruits. Control pear leaf blister mites with an oil spray combined with lime sulfur following fruit harvest. Reduce brown rot inoculum next spring by picking up and destroying all mummified or infected fruit this fall, along with...
  7. Could your fall landscape be more colorful?

    Could your fall landscape be more colorful?
    Aronia displays its fall colors. Many of Raintree Nursery’s shrubs and trees provide reliable fall color in addition to tasty fruit, consider adding some of these to your landscape. Some examples are: Aronia (red fall leaves, berries are juiced for jellies or beverages) Lingonberry or Wintergreen, both have bright red edible fruit on low growing plants Red Sunset Maple...
  8. Making apple cider

    Making apple cider
    The Campfield cider apple is a medium size cider apple, greenish yellow with a red blush. The flesh is white, firm, sweet and rich. Makes a great cider mixed with the variety Harrison. The tree is vigorous and productive. Origin: New Jersey 1817. Here at Raintree Nursery we enjoy making apple cider each October. We use a Cider Press to...
  9. Harvesting and storing walnuts, butternuts, and heartnuts

    Harvesting and storing walnuts, butternuts, and heartnuts
    Knock the nuts from the tree when the green hulls begin to split and the packing tissue between and around the kernel halves has just started to turn brown. Remove the hulls as soon as you can. There are several ways to remove the hulls: use a knife, stomp and roll the nuts with your foot, roll over them with...
  10. Taking Care of Mason Bees

    Taking Care of Mason Bees
    Homes of mason bees (Photo credit: Wikipedia) By October, mason bees have finished pupating inside their cocoons and are mature, waiting for springs’ signal to emerge. Between now and early December, you can handle the bees inside their cocoons without damaging them, or waking them up accidentally, making this the ideal time to clean your mason bees and blocks...

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