Uncategorized

  1. Irrigation practices during July heat

    Furrow irrigation system using siphon tubes (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Adjust water rates as necessary to keep up with plant demand without keeping the soil constantly saturated. Always check the soil 4-6” deep, rather than on the surface, before irrigating. A finger poked into the ground does not sense wet or dry well, but does sense temperature. If the soil...
  2. Cornus Mas: an edible dogwood

    Cornus Mas: an edible dogwood
    Redstone Cornus Mas (D568) These edible dogwoods — Cornus Mas (also known as Cornelian Cherry) have a big seed and delicious pungently flavored flesh. We offer both red and yellow fruited varieties and they both make wonderful jelly. They are ripe now at the Raintree Nursery. The trees are perfect for a yard growing about 10 to 12 feet tall. They have...
  3. Karmijn de Sonnaville apple: both sweet and tart

    Karmijn de Sonnaville apple: both sweet and tart
    Karmijn de Sonnaville apple Some people love the taste of sweet apples; others find sweet apples too bland and they prefer the taste of tart apples. However, the best tasting apples, according to taste-test panels, are apples that are both sweet and tart. The Karmijn de Sonnaville was rated as both the sweetest and the tartest of apples at the WSU Mt...
  4. Medlars: A delicious snack

    Medlars: A delicious snack
    In the winter, when all the fruit is long since picked and frosts have long since hit, attention can turn to the lowly Medlar. The Medlar fruit is roundish and often only 1 1/2 inches in diameter. They are brown and funny looking. After frosts they blett which means they soften. The pulp inside tastes like cinnamon applesauce if you can manage to eat it...
  5. Do your homework now; Plan for your spring garden!

    Are you planning to put in an orchard next spring, or re-design your landscape with more edible plants? Robert Kouriks’ “Your Edible Landscape Naturally” will guide you through each step of the design process. A good starting point in landscape design is to make a drawing of your landscape, including the hard-scape (buildings, paths, other structures, or the drain field...
  6. Fall pest maintenance: Destroy infested fruits

    Spray copper on apples and pears affected by anthracnose or European (Nectria) cankers at 50% leaf-fall. Apply spray for bacterial canker to stone fruits. Control pear leaf blister mites with an oil spray combined with lime sulfur following fruit harvest. Reduce brown rot inoculum next spring by picking up and destroying all mummified or infected fruit this fall, along with...
  7. Planting in Warm Climates

    Those of you living in the southern U.S. may be regularly experiencing day time temperatures in the 70’s. If this is the only time you can acquire particular plants, follow the late planting instructions in the Raintree Nursery Owners Manual or the following to ensure success with your new plants, or pre-order plants to be shipped to you at your...
  8. Re-potting fruiting plants in containers

    Re-potting fruiting plants in containers
    Because of shorter day length, most houseplants, even those which don’t lose their leaves, will not be actively growing now, even citrus with ripening fruit. So this is the time to re-pot if it’s been a couple of years since the last time. Move your plant into a slightly larger container; or trim roots ½- 2” around the sides, 1-4”...
  9. Spring Bulb Collection Package Clearance Sale

    Spring Bulb Collection Package Clearance Sale
    L060 Hocus Pocus There is still time to plant spring blooming bulbs in USDA Zones 7-10 and we have a special offer just for you: get 50% off our regular retail price for our Bulb Collection package. That's $85 dollars in bulbs, for only $42.50! The collection includes 110 bulbs: (Click on tulips, daffodils or irises on the home...
  10. Prepare your container garden plants for winter

    Prepare your container garden plants for winter
    As your first frost date approaches, it is time to prepare plants you are growing outdoors in containers for winter. Plant roots are generally not as hardy as the top of the plant, so they need to be protected from freezing during severe winter weather. Sink containers in the ground, or surround containers with sawdust or other insulating material. Another option is to move hardy dormant...

Items 11 to 20 of 28 total

Page