Raintree Nursery

The finest fruit cultivars from around the world

  1. Apple maggot and codling moth

    A bowl of gravenstein apples showing the effects of codling moth larva. The larvae feed especially on the protein rich seeds, which explains why the core of the cut apples have been almost completely eaten away. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Monitor both apple maggot and codling moth traps to determine when insect populations are increasing throughout the fruit development season...
  2. Dealing with powdery mildew and botrytis

    Powdery mildew (shown here on white wine grapes). (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Some varieties of grapes, apples, gooseberry, currants and other fruits are susceptible to powdery mildew. There are chemical fungicide sprays available at your local nursery, or you may want to try the recipe on page 22 in our Raintree Owner’s manual. You can achieve a reasonable level of...
  3. Dayton apple: early ripening, summer dessert apple

    Dayton apple: early ripening, summer dessert apple
    Dayton apple. This is a really good year for apple production here at Raintree Nursery and the early ripening apples are abundant. William's Pride and Pristine are already ripe and have been collected. The apple that is ripe now at Raintree is the Dayton. It is another of the scab and mildew resistant varieties. The large, round fruits are...
  4. Cornus Mas: an edible dogwood

    Cornus Mas: an edible dogwood
    Redstone Cornus Mas (D568) These edible dogwoods — Cornus Mas (also known as Cornelian Cherry) have a big seed and delicious pungently flavored flesh. We offer both red and yellow fruited varieties and they both make wonderful jelly. They are ripe now at the Raintree Nursery. The trees are perfect for a yard growing about 10 to 12 feet tall. They have...
  5. Karmijn de Sonnaville apple: both sweet and tart

    Karmijn de Sonnaville apple: both sweet and tart
    Karmijn de Sonnaville apple Some people love the taste of sweet apples; others find sweet apples too bland and they prefer the taste of tart apples. However, the best tasting apples, according to taste-test panels, are apples that are both sweet and tart. The Karmijn de Sonnaville was rated as both the sweetest and the tartest of apples at the WSU Mt...
  6. Medlars: A delicious snack

    Medlars: A delicious snack
    In the winter, when all the fruit is long since picked and frosts have long since hit, attention can turn to the lowly Medlar. The Medlar fruit is roundish and often only 1 1/2 inches in diameter. They are brown and funny looking. After frosts they blett which means they soften. The pulp inside tastes like cinnamon applesauce if you can manage to eat it...
  7. Do your homework now; Plan for your spring garden!

    Are you planning to put in an orchard next spring, or re-design your landscape with more edible plants? Robert Kouriks’ “Your Edible Landscape Naturally” will guide you through each step of the design process. A good starting point in landscape design is to make a drawing of your landscape, including the hard-scape (buildings, paths, other structures, or the drain field...
  8. It's Cider Making Time!

    It's Cider Making Time!
    Apples are an all-American success story-each of us eats more than 19 pounds of them annually. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Here at Raintree Nursery we enjoy making apple cider each October. We use a Cider Press to extract the juice from the apples, ours is made by Correll. They are hand made and do have a waiting list. www.correllciderpresses.com Often...
  9. Irrigation in the fall: Not too little, not too much

    Irrigation in the fall: Not too little, not too much
    English: Drip irrigation uses a series of pipes and tubes to deliver water to the base of each plant. Because little water is lost to evaporation and runoff, this method uses less water than sprinklers and trenches. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) In most locations fall rains should have begun and plants would then no longer need regular irrigation. If that...
  10. Mason Bee Care in the Fall

    Homes of mason bees (Photo credit: Wikipedia) By October, mason bees have finished pupating inside their cocoons and are mature, waiting for springs’ signal to emerge. Between now and early December you can handle the bees inside their cocoons without damaging them, or waking them up accidentally, making this the ideal time to clean your mason bees and blocks...