Fruit tree

  1. Pruning Your Vines, Espalier, Nuts, Berries and Fruit Trees

    Pruning Your Vines, Espalier, Nuts, Berries and Fruit Trees
    Free-standing espaliered fruit trees (step-over) at Standen, West Sussex, England May 2006. As can be seen, the trees are used to create a fruit border or low hedge (Photo credit: Wikipedia) VINES: Manage the canopy of your vigorous grape vines. As fall approaches it may be desirable to remove some leaves, or shoots, to expose ripening fruit to the...
  2. It's planting time for moderate winter climates!

    It's planting time for moderate winter climates!
    A test site with several fruit tree forms located at Gaasbeek Castle. (Wikicommons) Planting time has arrived for those in moderate winter climates including people living west of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest. So long as the ground is not under water or water-logged, frozen or covered with snow, and the temperature is above freezing when you...
  3. Mychorrizal fungi in your soil!

    Mychorrizal fungi in your soil!
    turned soil (Photo credit: willismonroe) If your soil has been recently disturbed, is low in organic matter, or is imported, your fruit trees will also benefit from the addition of mychorrizal fungi at planting time, #T185 Myco Paks. The fungal organisms in these packets are normally found in association with the root systems of healthy deciduous trees and some...
  4. FAQs: When should I expect to harvest the first fruit from my new fruit tree/berries?

    FAQs: When should I expect to harvest the first fruit from my new fruit tree/berries?
    English: Fruit on display at La Boqueria market in Barcelona. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) When should I expect to harvest the first fruit from my new fruit tree? Our standard answer is 2-3 years to first fruit. In some cases your trees may arrive with flower buds and be apparently ready to produce fruit. It is best, however, to remove...

4 Item(s)