Pruning

  1. Organic Weed Control

    Organic Weed Control
    Malus sylvestris at Vosseslag - De Haan, Belgium (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Control weeds and keep grass short around bushes and trees and among recently planted ground covers. Maintain a minimum 3’ diameter circle for each tree or shrub that is free of competing weeds. If there are a lot of weeds coming up in your new groundcover planting, lay...
  2. July pruning tips: trees, shrubs, grapes, espalier

    July pruning tips: trees, shrubs, grapes, espalier
    Members of the Women's Land Army prune fruit trees in an orchard in the United Kingdom during the First World War. Trees and shrubs: keep pruning light this time of year, removing no more than ¼ of the live branches. Thin out water sprout wood before it gets very big, unless you are planning to do some grafting from...
  3. Dormant season pruning continues in February

    Dormant season pruning continues in February
    English: Pruning the vines (Photo credit: Wikipedia) See the Raintree Plant Owners Manual for basic pruning information, or check out our selection of pruning books. Finish pruning grapes, kiwis, figs, maples, and other heavy sap producers this month, before the weather starts to warm, to avoid excess bleeding from the wounds. Prune stone fruits (plum, cherry, peach, apricot, and almond) after...
  4. Prune as needed or as time permits during April

    Prune as needed or as time permits during April
    Continue pruning as needed, or as time permits. The best time to start pruning stone fruits is as the buds swell. This is because the wounds seal themselves more quickly, reducing opportunity for fungal infections to occur. If you are growing tip-bearing apples such as Thompkins King and want to encourage them to branch, wait until new growth has extended...
  5. Dormant season pruning continues in February

    Dormant season pruning continues in February
    Some Pruning tools that can be used to maintain a garden. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Dormant season pruning continues. See the Raintree Plant Owners Manual for basic pruning information, or check out our selection of pruning books. Finish pruning grapes, kiwis, figs, maples, and other heavy sap producers this month, before the weather starts to warm, to avoid excess bleeding from the...
  6. Pruning in the winter

    Pruning in the winter
    Cover via Amazon In the Pacific Northwest plants become fully dormant in December. Dormant season pruning generally begins in January, after the distractions of the winter holidays. If there is still a significant risk of snow, ice or wind damage in your trees it may be best to wait another month or so to start pruning. Certain plants are...
  7. Pruning in December

    Pruning in December
    Pruning shears. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Once your trees, shrubs, and vines have achieved full dormancy (leaves on the ground for deciduous plants, no tender new growth buds visible on evergreen plants) you can begin dormant season pruning. If you tend to experience a lot of freeze, wind, or fungal damage during the more severe part of winter it might...
  8. Avoid pruning if possible; cut back your blackberries and raspberries

    Avoid pruning if possible; cut back your blackberries and raspberries
    Avoid fruit tree pruning, except broken or dead limbs, if trees or shrubs are not fully dormant or approaching dormancy. Open wounds heal more slowly as trees are approaching dormancy, increasing the opportunity for fungal infections to occur. If you have not yet done so, cut out old dead fruited canes from blackberries, raspberries, and related hybrids after fruiting and...

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