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Cascade Trailing Blackberry

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Original price $13.99 - Original price $13.99
Original price
$13.99
$13.99 - $13.99
Current price $13.99
SKU E520

Rubus ursinus

Every summer from Alaska to Northern California, fruit lovers "in the know" pick (and trip over) our sweet, especially tasty, native trailing blackberries. We offer a selection found in the wild that is among the biggest and sweetest ever found, although still small.

Grow them on a trellis, so they won't be underfoot and so you can pick lots of fruit which is otherwise only available in the wild - and fetches a very high price when wildcrafted! We offer female plants that are self fertile. USDA Zones 7-9.

Size: 4" Pot

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Ask a Question
  • How can it be both only female and self-fertile ? Is it actually monoecious ?

    Most blackberries, and many fruiting plants (like Asian plums), are monoecious. Some plants are parthenocarpic however, like figs and mulberries, and bear fruit without any pollination.

  • How far apart do I plant the Cascade Trailing blackberries if at the foot of a hoop shaped cattle panel trellis? Should I then direct them just upwards and over, or should they be instead planted & directed to go up & out along a 4' x 16' horizontally placed cattle panel trellis? How long do the vines get? I have only seen them all over the ground. I have ten plants. Thank you for supplying these!

    You can. They are more easily trellised on a horizontal wire setup, but a cattle panel or utility panel works fine too. As they are thorny, they should be trellised for ease of access, to avoid discomfort while harvesting.

  • I have very thin trailing blackberry vines with fine thorns. Some vibes have heavily serrated leaves and some have "regular" blackberry leaves. They bloom but I have never seen fruit. Are they male natives? Are they useful? Do I add females?

    There are yes! Those are obviously male vines. Cascade Trailing is a self-fertile cultivar of the native Rubus ursinis.

Customer Reviews

Based on 5 reviews
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C
Carol

Very nice looking plants. I jut got them in the ground this week but they are already growing well.

P
Patricia C.
Blackberry heaven

Looking forward to these nice plants producing our favorite blackberry. Any pie or cobbler will enhance

C
Cailyn
Great blackberries!

Love these blackberries. Bought this plant last year & it grew some good canes to fruit this year. Next year's canes are even more vigorous! The berries this year are DELICIOUS. PNW, ripening in early July. Almost unnoticeable seeds and a sweet, distinctly perfect "blackberry" flavor. The berries are a nice cone shape a little over an inch long. A good Goldilocks size. We have pretty terrible clay soil and it got leaf spot, but it's still doing great. Next summer it should make a lot of berries!

L
Laird

I liked its trailing habit - I'm standing up a food forest for small wildlife ( think Box Turtles) and these blackberries fit right in.

L
Laird T.
Cascade trailing blackberries

I bought 2, just in case...

They will be a vital part of the food forest I'm creating while doing native reforestation of the understory that the local white-tail deer herd browsed to oblivion during the 6.+ decades before I arrived & began intervention

A predominant consumer will be the 9 Eastern Box Turtles that I expect to hatch in ~5 weeks and begin their growth to maturity here. One of the blackberries had flower buds when it arrived. I have high hopes!